In-product word list

What words to use in Adobe’s in-product experiences, and when.

Using this resource#


Consistent language builds user trust and strengthens their knowledge that a product is meeting their needs. Using inconsistent vocabulary across Adobe’s apps and products can be confusing to users, and it makes it harder for those creating education and documentation. Below is a list of words that we either recommend using, or suggest avoiding.

For capitalization guidance, view the Grammar and mechanics page for the UX writing style guide. Keep in mind that some terms are branded and follow Adobe Brand Guidelines for styling and usage.

This list is regularly updated and is by no means complete. If you have any questions or seek clarity on any words on this list, you can email us.


Word or PhraseStatusUsage Notes

app

#
Preferred

“App” is preferred over “application” for the sake of brevity, simplicity, and because “app” is so widely used now to describe both desktop and mobile software applications.

application

#
Use with caution

“App” is preferred over “application” for the sake of brevity, simplicity, and because “app” is so widely used now to describe both desktop and mobile software applications.

asset

#
Use with caution

Jargon for any file, element, or content that a user needs to complete their goal, as well as the output of completing that goal.

At Adobe, this includes things such as desktop-synced files, mobile creations, Creative Cloud libraries, images, fonts, colors, gradients, or CSS information.

“Asset” is a generic word and has multiple meanings which can be conflicting or ambiguous. For example, there are “assets” that are part of a creative agency workflow, and there are “assets” to describe a generic grouping of disparate items.

Try to avoid using this word if possible. Instead, be more specific and describe what something is, such as a “video” or an “illustration.” If you can’t, proceed with “asset.”

auto-

#
Use with caution

Avoid using this prefix whenever possible and spell out the words instead (e.g., “automatically install,” not “auto-install”).

Make exceptions to this rule when necessary to adhere to space constraints on mobile, or when “auto-” is part of a tool’s name (e.g., "auto-crop," "auto-tone").

These instances are acceptable and can stand alone as a verb:

  • auto-update
  • auto-play
  • auto-animate
  • auto-save
  • auto-target
  • auto-analyze

Do not use the following:

  • auto-create
  • auto-group, auto-grouping
  • automagically
  • auto-smart tone

begin

#
Preferred

Preferred for descriptive text. For a call-to-action, use “start.”

blacklist

#
Avoid

This word has roots in racism and oppression. Replace it with this format to provide contextual clarity:

(Action)(object)

For example:

  • “Blocked users”
  • “Prohibited IP addresses”

button

#
Preferred

When referring to a specific button in an interface, try to refer to the action (e.g, "undo," "edit") rather than naming the button.

If you need to refer to the interface element directly, capitalize and bold the name of the button but not the word “button” itself (e.g., "Undo button," "Edit button").

click

#
Avoid

Avoid instructing a user to “click” or “tap.” Instead, use a call-to-action and the right design component to imply the interaction. View “select.”

When you need to refer to the result of clicking on something, use the same words as the call-to-action.

close

#
Use with caution

Use “close” in reference to OS-specific patterns, but avoid for calls-to-action. View “done.”

continue / cancel

#
Preferred

Use “continue” and “cancel” as dual actions in workflows where there is only one way to move forward and it’s not possible to skip or go back steps.

current version / previous version

#
Avoid

When referring to apps, "latest version" / "older version" is preferred.

dismiss

#
Avoid

Avoid using “dismiss” as an action. Use “OK” instead.

done

#
Preferred

Use “done” as a call-to-action instead of “close” for a standalone button in a dialog or other modal. In a flow, use “done” instead of “finish” when someone reaches the end and wants to exit. View "finish."

drag and drop

#
Use with caution

Instructions for interactions should use the same words that the OS does.

feature

#
Use with caution

A single, outcome-oriented functionality of a product or service. Determining if something is a “feature” happens through a partnership between product, marketing, and branding. This word should not be used to mean “everything in a product.”

file name

#
Preferred

Two words. Use instead of one word, “filename,” in user-facing content. A “filename” is the technical name that a file system creates (and includes the file type extension). The “file name” is the name for the file that a user creates.

file type

#
Preferred

Two words. Use instead of one word, “filetype," to refer to file formats such as PNG, JPEG, PDF, PSD, AI, PSDC, etc.

finish

#
Preferred

Only use “finish” in headlines, body copy, or metadata. It should not be used as a call-to-action. View "done."

got it

#
Avoid

“Got it” is overly colloquial. Use "OK" instead.

latest version / older version

#
Preferred

Preferred over “current version" / "previous version” when referring to apps.

long press

#
Use with caution

Instructions for interactions should use the same words that the OS does.

More menu

#
Preferred

In interface language, try not to directly refer to the ellipsis (“…”) contextual menu that provides more options. If you need to refer to it directly, call it the “More menu.”

Bold the word “More” and capitalize it; “menu” is lowercase, not bolded.

name

#
Preferred

Another word for “file.” Do not use “title” to mean “name.”

next / back

#
Preferred

Use “next” and “back” in workflows (e.g., tours, tasks) where someone would be going back and forth in the flow.

next / previous

#
Preferred

Use “next” and “previous” for pagination (e.g., pages of search results).

OK

#
Preferred

Use “OK” as a primary action for acknowledgement. Avoid using “dismiss” as an action. Style in all-caps no matter the interface element, not as "Ok" or "ok."

OS

#
Preferred

Abbreviation of “operating system.”

pinch

#
Use with caution

Instructions for interactions should use the same words that the OS does.

please

#
Preferred

Use in an instructional way, and in error messages when asking a user to do an action that requires significant effort or time (e.g., “Please provide feedback,” “Please reload the page”).

plugin

#
Preferred

One word, no hyphen (not: “plug-in”).

press

#
Use with caution

Instructions for interactions should use the same words that the OS does.

program

#
Avoid

Use “app” instead.

quit

#
Avoid

Avoid this word especially as a call-to-action because it is platform-specific. While you can “quit” on MacOS, you can “exit” or “close” on Windows.

“Quit” can be used generally as a reference to this action on MacOS.

recommend, recommendation

#
Preferred

Use “recommend” (verb) and “recommendation” (noun) for when a human is doing the action (e.g., “We recommend backing up your work before sharing”).

To “suggest” or make a “suggestion” is the preferred way to describe when AI or other technology is doing the action.

scroll

#
Use with caution

Instructions for interactions should use the same words that the OS does.

see

#
Avoid

In order to be more inclusive, avoid using the word “see.” Use the word “view” instead. For example, instead of “See all results,” say “View all results.”

select

#
Preferred

“Select” is the preferred gestural word over “click” or “tap” for several reasons:

  • It’s device-agnostic, meaning that it’s not necessary to write a new string for different devices.
  • It’s more inclusive because many people using assistive technology aren’t clicking or tapping to take an action.
  • It guards against future design changes and surface migrations. For example, if a UI element stops being “clickable” and instead uses a slider, the word “select” would still work for both cases.

service

#
Preferred

Describes content, components, data, and/or dynamic features. At Adobe, this word is used contextually across many things (e.g., plugins, cloud storage, search, help).

skip

#
Preferred

OK to use as a call-to-action in stepped flows, such as a coach mark series.

software

#
Use with caution

Programs and other services that are used by a device. Only use “software” when the words “app,” “service,” or “product” are not sufficient for the use case.

sorry

#
Use with caution

Only use the word “sorry” in error messaging scenarios where the error causes a major interruption and inconvenience for a user (e.g., needing to restart their device, if work they had saved was lost).

space

#
Preferred

The amount of room available. “Space” refers to this concept on a local machine or device (e.g., “You don’t have enough space on your computer to save this file”).

“Storage” is the word for this in the cloud (e.g., “Your Creative Cloud storage is full”).

start

#
Preferred

Preferred over “begin” for calls-to-action. Variations on this call-to-action using the word “start” are also acceptable (e.g., “Start tour”).

storage

#
Preferred

The amount of room available. “Storage” refers to this concept in the cloud (e.g., “Your Creative Cloud storage is full”).

“Space” is the word for this on a local machine or device. (e.g., “You don’t have enough space on your computer to save this file”).

submit

#
Preferred

When asking users to share feedback, use “Submit” as the call-to-action, not “Share.”

success, successful, successfully

#
Avoid

Adding “success,” "successful," or "successfully" to a message is usually redundant and unnecessary. For example, say “Your password was reset" instead of “Your password has been reset successfully.”

suggest, suggestion

#
Preferred

Use “suggest” (verb) or “suggestion” (noun) for when AI or other technology — not a human — is doing the action.

To “recommend” or make a “recommendation” is the preferred way to describe when a human is doing the action.

swipe

#
Avoid

Instructions for interactions should use the same words that the OS does. Reserving "swipe” actions for intuitive actions in-line with the mobile OS should make it unnecessary to use this word in UI copy.

tab

#
Preferred

When referring to a specific tab in an interface, respect the capitalization of the name of the tab as it appears in the UI but don’t capitalize the word “tab.” Bold the name of the tab but not the word “tab” (e.g., “Learn tab,” “Your Work tab,” “Apps tab”).

tap

#
Use with caution

If at all possible, avoid instructing a user to “tap” or “click.” Instead, use a call-to-action and the right design component to imply the interaction. View “select.”

When referring to the result of tapping on something, use the same word(s) as the call-to-action. There are some instances where using the word “tap” can't be avoided because of device mechanics, such as selecting points on a tablet.

title

#
Avoid

For field labels, “name” is the preferred word for a file name or for the name of another kind of entity. Do not use “title” to mean “name.”

tool

#
Preferred

When referring to a specific tool in an interface, respect the capitalization of the name of the tool as it appears in the UI but do not capitalize the word “tool.” Bold the name of the tool but not the word “tool” (e.g., “Zoom tool,” “Pen tool,” “Undo tool”).

touch and hold

#
Avoid

Instructions for interactions should use the same words that the OS does.

update

#
Preferred

Unlike an upgrade, an update does not usually require payment (e.g., “Update your browser,” “Update your app”).

upgrade

#
Preferred

Unlike an update, an upgrade usually requires payment (e.g., “Upgrade your plan,” “Upgrade to the full version of Photoshop”).

view

#
Preferred

To be more inclusive, “view” is preferred over the word “see.” For example, say “View all results” instead of “See all results.”

whitelist

#
Avoid

This word has roots in racism and oppression. Replace it with this format to provide contextual clarity:

(Action)(object)

For example:

  • “Shared domains”
  • "Approved users"
  • “Targeted sites”

wifi

#
Preferred

All lowercase, no hyphen or space.